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Radford Dale, Nudity, Syrah, 2014, Voor Paardeberg, South Africa, No Added Sulphites

December 31, 2018

 

 

Radford Dale, Nudity, Syrah, 2014, Voor Paardeberg, South Africa, No Added Sulphites

 

The Wine Society - £18.00

 

Tasting date - 31/12/2018

 

 

Appearance - Medium ruby

 

Nose intensity - Medium plus  

 

Primary aroma - Redcurrant, cranberry, plum, blackberry, bramble, sour cherry, violet and a hint of black pepper

 

Secondary aroma - Light hints of clove and toast

 

Tertiary aroma - None

 

 

Sweetness - Dry

 

Acidity - Medium plus ( however the acid may ‘feel’ higher due to winemaking techniques )

 

Tannin and nature -  Medium ripe and soft

 

Alcohol - Medium

 

Body - Medium

 

 

Intensity - Medium plus

 

Primary flavours -  Redcurrant, cranberry, plum, blackberry, bramble, sour cherry, pickled beetroot, violet and a hint of black pepper

 

Secondary flavours - Light hints of clove and toast

 

Tertiary flavours - None

 

 

Finish - Long

 

Quality - Very Good

 

 

Blind Tasting Logic

 

 

An incredibly interesting wine to taste and logic for quality will require more thought than other wines in the line-up.

 

The winemaking techniques aim to preserve freshness and purity and have created a Syrah unlike any I have tried from South Africa, with that in mind this would not be a suitable candidate for an examination wine, there simply are not enough generally accepted Syrah characteristics in this wine to get you to a variety, let alone an origin; Medium colour, 12% alcohol and some red fruit character would be too confusing for a student. This wine is more likely to appear in an MW exam with a focus how the grape growing and winemaking techniques created this sort of wine.

 

The wine’s quality lies in its purity which I believe is the winemakers intention, fresh and lightly extracted with a focus on delicate floral notes, the oak is minimal  this is the sort of wine to enjoy if you enjoy red’s from Austria, Alto Adige, Savoie or Beaujolais. The length is long but there needs to be more power on the palate and a view that it will age for much longer to develop tertiary notes in order for it to be considered outstanding. A tough one but taste it like you are drinking a Pinot Noir and it will make more sense!

 

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